About: 1860 / 1862, Beauvais   Goto Sponge  NotDistinct  Permalink

An Entity of Type : ecrm:E22_Man-Made_Object, within Data Space : data.silknow.org associated with source document(s)

British Galleries: Tapestry became an important element of French Style. The finest tapestries came from France. To meet demand throughout Europe, the state-sponsored French factory at Beauvais devoted its entire production to seat covers. [27/03/2003] 'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900' The work of the Beauvais manufactory in this century consisted largely in production of tapestry-woven seat covers for sets of furniture. This specimen formed part of a gift of appreciation made to this Museum by the French Emperor in 1862. The floral design recalls designs of the previous century. Its designer exhibited flower paintings in the Paris Salon, acted as professor at the Gobelins manufactory from 1850, and won a first class medal in the 1855 Exhibition. [1987-2006]

AttributesValues
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • 1860 / 1862, Beauvais
rdfs:comment
  • British Galleries: Tapestry became an important element of French Style. The finest tapestries came from France. To meet demand throughout Europe, the state-sponsored French factory at Beauvais devoted its entire production to seat covers. [27/03/2003] 'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900' The work of the Beauvais manufactory in this century consisted largely in production of tapestry-woven seat covers for sets of furniture. This specimen formed part of a gift of appreciation made to this Museum by the French Emperor in 1862. The floral design recalls designs of the previous century. Its designer exhibited flower paintings in the Paris Salon, acted as professor at the Gobelins manufactory from 1850, and won a first class medal in the 1855 Exhibition. [1987-2006] (en)
  • This is part of a set of tapestry woven chair covers (two panels, for the seat and back; the other museum no. 7928-1862). This was a type of furnishing much favoured by the wealthy who, eschewing avant garde taste, sought a regal, luxurious, but more traditional type of furnishing in their homes. The panels were woven at the National Manufactory at Beauvais, France. This was then the most important French tapestry manufactory under official patronage after the Gobelin Works in Paris. Large figurative tapestry panels fell out of fashion in the 19th century so manufacture concentrated on the production of furnishings. From 1804 Beauvais supplied French royal and imperial palaces. Pierre-Adrien Chabal-Dussurgey, the designer of these panels, trained in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Lyon, the centre of the French silk-weaving industry. His tapestry designs were used both at Beauvais and at Gobelin where from 1850 he held the post of professor. His designs were awarded medals at various international exhibitions, including that of 1855, where the jurors extolled his work with the comments: 'These are no conventional flowers, but a truly magical bouquet sown on these fabrics by a felicitous hand'. These chair panels formed part of his exhibits at the International Exhibition of 1862, described as 'furniture in the style of Louis XV and XVI ....intended for Imperial palaces'. The chair covers were presented to the South Kensington Museum by Emperor Napoleon III in recognition of assistance given by officials of the Museum to the members of the French Jury at the Paris Exhibition of 1862. (en)
  • Tapestry (cover for chair seat), woven in wool and silk, with floral design. (en)
  • Seat cover, designed by P.-A. Chabal-Dussurgey, made by the Beauvais Tapestry Factory; France, 1860-1862 (en)
sameAs
dc:identifier
  • 7927-1862
P3 has note
  • British Galleries: Tapestry became an important element of French Style. The finest tapestries came from France. To meet demand throughout Europe, the state-sponsored French factory at Beauvais devoted its entire production to seat covers. [27/03/2003] 'American and European Art and Design 1800-1900' The work of the Beauvais manufactory in this century consisted largely in production of tapestry-woven seat covers for sets of furniture. This specimen formed part of a gift of appreciation made to this Museum by the French Emperor in 1862. The floral design recalls designs of the previous century. Its designer exhibited flower paintings in the Paris Salon, acted as professor at the Gobelins manufactory from 1850, and won a first class medal in the 1855 Exhibition. [1987-2006] (en)
  • This is part of a set of tapestry woven chair covers (two panels, for the seat and back; the other museum no. 7928-1862). This was a type of furnishing much favoured by the wealthy who, eschewing avant garde taste, sought a regal, luxurious, but more traditional type of furnishing in their homes. The panels were woven at the National Manufactory at Beauvais, France. This was then the most important French tapestry manufactory under official patronage after the Gobelin Works in Paris. Large figurative tapestry panels fell out of fashion in the 19th century so manufacture concentrated on the production of furnishings. From 1804 Beauvais supplied French royal and imperial palaces. Pierre-Adrien Chabal-Dussurgey, the designer of these panels, trained in the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Lyon, the centre of the French silk-weaving industry. His tapestry designs were used both at Beauvais and at Gobelin where from 1850 he held the post of professor. His designs were awarded medals at various international exhibitions, including that of 1855, where the jurors extolled his work with the comments: 'These are no conventional flowers, but a truly magical bouquet sown on these fabrics by a felicitous hand'. These chair panels formed part of his exhibits at the International Exhibition of 1862, described as 'furniture in the style of Louis XV and XVI ....intended for Imperial palaces'. The chair covers were presented to the South Kensington Museum by Emperor Napoleon III in recognition of assistance given by officials of the Museum to the members of the French Jury at the Paris Exhibition of 1862. (en)
  • Tapestry (cover for chair seat), woven in wool and silk, with floral design. (en)
  • Seat cover, designed by P.-A. Chabal-Dussurgey, made by the Beauvais Tapestry Factory; France, 1860-1862 (en)
P43 has dimension
P65 shows visual item
P138 has representation
P102 has title
  • 1860 / 1862, Beauvais
is P106 is composed of of
is P41 classified of
is P108 has produced of
is rdf:subject of
is P129 is about of
is P24 transferred title of of
is crmsci:O8_observed of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.16.103 as of Jun 21 2021


Alternative Linked Data Documents: ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 07.20.3232 as of Jun 21 2021, on Linux (x86_64-pc-linux-musl), Single-Server Edition (125 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2022 OpenLink Software